Real vs Fake: Information Literacy

For the #engageMOOC class, we were challenged to use Mike Caulfield’s Four Moves and a Habit which helps readers discern what the truth is in what they are reading online and help with their digital literacy (steps below).

Caulfield_s_4_Moves

For this challenge I went to his blog and chose an activity to show how the four moves worked. The activity I chose was to verify if a photo of Vladmir Putin was surrounded by other leaders including Trump at an international conference (see below).

4Moves

My first instinct was to reverse Google image search the image and see where the image came from. The first thing that comes up from this is a suggested word search for the image which is “g20 trump putin fake” which made me instantly realize this picture was fake. When I first saw the image on the blog it definitely looked suspicious, the biggest clue for me was the closeness of Putin’s head to the guys leaning behind him- I felt it was fake from the get go. But I was curious to see what came up when seeing the origins of the image. With the reserve image search, the first link that came up was a link to CNN regarding that G20 summit but did not include the image itself but included other images with Trump and Putin but cited them from Getty images which is a trusted source. The five links under that link were all regarding the circulation of the fake photo and how it was going viral. The links regarding the image being fake also provided the original image from Getty image which did not have Putin in the middle but instead just an empty chair. After finding the evidence that the photo was fake from sources like BusinessInsider and CNN, I decided to do a regular google search with “g20 trump putin fake” which came up with the altered photo in the images section and with similar links stating the image is fake. It also provided links and images with Trump and Putin’s actual conversation at the summit. While doing this research I thought about the Four Moves and it really helped me think about the sources and to dig a little deeper when looking at images or stories online.

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